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Sign me up, Sarah!

Bear watching on Alaska CruiseSo, you hear about the once in a lifetime trip your friends took to Alaska on the David B… Or maybe you are searching about small ship cruises to Alaska and find our website… Or you are reading Outdoor Photography magazine and see one of our ads.

Eventually, you click on “Contact Us” and sign up for our newsletter to find out more about the David B and its crew.

Then one day, Christine’s photos of Alaska’s wilderness and a witty article about a previous trip from Jeffrey seals the deal and you get excited enough to book a trip.

What do you do next?
Say “Sign me up, Sarah!”

Here’s how it works. I’m Sarah, and let me take you through what you can expect in terms of making a reservation with us and what it’s like working with me, “shore support” for the David B.

I take the reservations (as well as serve as cat staff to Harriet and Oswald (Jeffrey and Christine’s cats,)Shore support David B Cruises while the David B is in Alaska during the summers.) It’s my pleasure to answer the questions you have about our trips. I’m even more delighted when someone I am communicating with signs up.

So when you say, “Sign me up, Sarah!” the first step is the deposit. I’ll send you an email invoice to pay. We take payments through QuickBooks online. This way I don’t have access to your credit card information and it’s all on their secure server.

Once we receive your reservation deposit, I’ll send you our Welcome Letter. It highlights all the details of your trip so you can start planning your flights and hotels. Of course, I am always happy to answer your questions with suggestions about side trips and what to do if you plan to stay a few extra days in port before or after your trip.

Shag Cove in Glacier Bay - David B CruisesThen things are pretty quiet after that for a while. I’ll probably do some knitting or play with Harriet.

When your trip is a little over 90 days away, I’ll contact you again with a reminder that your final payment is due. You can pay online again or send us a check if that’s more convenient. If you make your reservation less than 90 days before the trip sails, then you would have paid in full at that time.

Again 6 weeks out, I’ll be in touch to make sure we have all of your Health and Liability forms filled out. This is where you can tell us your food allergies, special diets or what interests you most about your upcoming trip so we can customize the adventure just for you.

As your trip approaches, the emails become more frequent with a trip reminder two weeks out making sure your flights are confirmed, and finally a few days beforehand to make sure you know how to find the boat on the day of your trip.

On the day of a trip, even though I’m not there, I’m just as excited as you are! However, my job isn’t finished yet. Merch for David B cruisesAfter I get a text from Jeffrey that everyone has arrived at the boat safely, boarded, and you are underway I usually don’t hear anything, but I am available to the crew throughout the trip – just in case.

After your trip, I’ll send you an invoice for any David B Gear you purchased to take home such as a book, coffee mug or sweatshirt. And finally, I’ll send a post-trip survey to find out how we did.

So if this has made you interested in signing up with us, don’t hesitate to contact me and say “Sign me up, Sarah!”

Stay safe and stay well,
Sarah

PS – If you have any questions about any of our trips in Alaska, the San Juan Islands, or the Inside Passage, send me an email or give me a call at 360-474-7218.

PPS – Also, if you would like a private tour of the David B contact me to schedule an appointment for our spring Open Boat on the afternoons of  April 10 or 11 from 2-6pm.  Each appointment will 30 minutes with a 15-minute gap between appointments. The maximum group size will be 5 and masks will be required.

How Will COVID-19 Affect My Trip?

As the calendar turned from 2020 to 2021 we started asking ourselves more often what the new seasonCovid Policy David B Cruises will look like in terms of COVID-19 precautions and policies. We feel that the virus is still a moving target and it’s hard to know exactly what to expect. Our hopes are that the vaccination rollout will gain momentum and the vast majority of us will be vaccinated soon. For now, we are keeping our COVID-19 policies in place. You can visit our COVID-19 policy page for more information. In the meantime, here’s what we’re working on making sure that travel aboard the David B, while the coronavirus is still an issue, is as safe as possible.

 

Here’s what travel will likely look like this summer:
Rescheduling: You may still reschedule a trip due to COVID without penalty, but only one more time for folks who scheduled in 2020 and just once for folks who schedule with us in 2021. We plan to return to our regular cancelation policy when vaccines become widespread. We anticipate this will happen in late summer or early fall.
Pre-Travel Preparations: We are still asking folks to take extreme caution prior to their trip through quarantine, mask-wearing, and proper hygiene. You will need to provide proof of a negative test that was taken no more than 72 hours prior to boarding. We are also looking into the possibility of requiring a second rapid test that will be administered just prior to boarding. Because it is still unknown if a vaccinated person can spread the virus we will be looking to the CDC guidelines to see if vaccinated people can skip testing or if we will need to require testing for those folks as well.
Vaccinations: Like many small and large businesses in tourism, we would like to require vaccinations for all of our passengers. However, there may be many legal implications, and there simply may not be enough vaccinations available until later spring or early summer.
Your crew, Jeffrey and Christine, will become eligible for their vaccinations in February or late March in Washington state according to the current vaccination timeline. It is our intention that the crew will be vaccinated prior to the season beginning.
Canada: Our north and southbound Learn to Cruise trips that run through Canada may have to be modified depending on when the border is open to non-essential travel. Last year Canada Customs had us stop and Alaska Scenerydo a health check. We were then given permission to anchor if needed due to any weather or mechanical issues. No one was allowed to get off the boat for any reason. If this continues to be the case, our plan is to cruise up the Inside Passage in 4-6 days possibly running 24/7 and anchoring only if necessary. Once we cross the border into Alaska, we will make up the remaining days by cruising in Misty Fjords National Monument. It’s a good time of year for bear viewing, and with the reduction of cruise ships, Misty Fjords will be quiet, remote, and stunningly beautiful. We will be monitoring this closely and will likely know in March if the border will be open in late April when we leave to go north.
Alaska: Alaska’s Health Mandate for interstate travel is still in effect and requires that all travelers arriving in Alaska must take a test at least 72 hours prior to arrival in Alaska, have proof of a negative test, and fill out a health declaration. For our Northbound Learn to Cruise trip that ends in Ketchikan, Alaska allows us to count our days underway as quarantine days after people board in Bellingham with their COVID-19 negative test.
Hotels/Taxis: Last season, in an effort to protect the communities from potential exposure we asked that passengers arrive at the David B on the day of the trip and we then picked everyone up at the airport with the exception of Petersburg where taxi service or walking was acceptable. We are still working out whether this will be necessary for 2021.
What ifs: If you or another guest arrives aboard the David B and begins showing symptoms of COVIDDavid B Small Cruise Ship in Fords Terror-19, you will be isolated in your cabin and the trip will end. We will return to the dock and you will be required to quarantine in a hotel at your own expense until you test negative.
Like you, we are so tired of the virus and can’t wait for it to be a memory, but while we wait for that day, we’ll continue to work hard to make sure we are doing everything we can to make your trip safe. We’ll continue to update you about changes. If you have any questions about travel this year aboard the David B, please call or email Sarah. She’s great at fielding your questions.
We look forward to seeing you on the David B!

Preparations for a New Year

David B in Glacier BayThere have been a handful of times we’ve waited out a storm while tucked into some comfy cove. As the storm blows through, the gusts of wind pull on the anchor chain and the boat swings. Sometimes a gust will blow so hard it yanks the boat with a big shake. As the storm rages, we shelter at anchor and watch the wind speed. We check to make sure the anchor holds. We wait. We watch. We play cards. We bake cookies. We ride out the storm.

Eventually, the wind calms, and the skies begin to clear. This past year has felt like one long storm that won’t ever let up. At times we’ve wondered if our figurative anchor would hold. But now there are days where it feels like the storm is just beginning to ease and the skies are starting to clear. Sure, there are still big gusts out there that can blow us around but that won’t stop us from planning for this new year.

Our 2021 season is scheduled to begin on April 22 with our sold-out northbound Learn to Cruise from our home port in Bellingham to Ketchikan. As we look ahead we’re excited to once again see we have a busy season in front of us. Over the last few months, we’ve been working on lots of big and small projects. Jeffrey recently completed a realignment of the engine and replaced a couple of bearings on the thrust shaft. Next month, we will be hauling out and we plan to have a new rudder installed, so in some ways it all seems normal. But the virus is still with us and it’s still a consideration as we plan for the new season.

We are updating our COVID-19 policies regarding vaccinations, travel to the boat, hotel stays, deposits, and reservations. We’re hoping that vaccines will be widely available so that people who want to travel with us can be vaccinated. Nevertheless, we might have to fall back on the COVID-19 policies we put into place for the 2020 season, which we found to be effective. Because the situation continues to change rapidly we will continue to keep you informed.

In the meantime, we will continue to prepare for 2021 and we look forward to seeing you in the near future.

Stay well,

-Christine

PS – If you have any questions about any of our trips in Alaska, the San Juan Islands, or the Inside Passage, send Sarah, an email or give her a call at 360-474-7218.

PSS – I almost forgot to mention, but we will be having an Open Boat over the weekend of April 10 and 11. It will be a little different than our usual as we will be showing the boat by appointment only. Each appointment will 30 minutes with a 15-minute gap between appointments. You can email Sarah for availability. We’ll have more info coming soon!

Preparations for a New Year

David B in Glacier BayThere have been a handful of times we’ve waited out a storm while tucked into some comfy cove. As the storm blows through, the gusts of wind pull on the anchor chain and the boat swings. Sometimes a gust will blow so hard it yanks the boat with a big shake. As the storm rages, we shelter at anchor and watch the wind speed. We check to make sure the anchor holds. We wait. We watch. We play cards. We bake cookies. We ride out the storm.

Eventually the wind calms, and the skies begin to clear. This past year has felt like one long storm that won’t ever let up. At times we’ve wondered if our figurative anchor would hold. But now there are days where it feels like the storm is just beginning to ease and the skies are starting to clear. Sure, there are still big gusts out there that can blow us around but that won’t stop us from planning for this new year.

Our 2021 season is scheduled to begin on April 22 with our sold-out northbound Learn to Cruise from our home port in Bellingham to Ketchikan. As we look ahead we’re excited to once again see we have a busy season in front of us. Over the last few months, we’ve been working on lots of big and small projects. Jeffrey recently completed a realignment of the engine and replaced a couple of bearings on the thrust shaft. Next month, we will be hauling out and we plan to have a new rudder installed, so in some ways it all seems normal. But the virus is still with us and it’s still a consideration as we plan for the new season.

We are updating our COVID-19 policies regarding vaccinations, travel to the boat, hotel stays, deposits, and reservations. We’re hoping that vaccines will be widely available so that people who want to travel with us can be vaccinated. Nevertheless, we might have to fall back on the COVID-19 policies we put into place for the 2020 season, which we found to be effective. Because the situation continues to change rapidly we will continue to keep you informed.

In the meantime, we will continue to prepare for 2021 and we look forward to seeing you in the near future.

Stay well,

-Christine

PS – If you have any questions about any of our trips in Alaska, the San Juan Islands, or the Inside Passage, send Sarah, an email or give her a call at 360-474-7218.

The Results Are In!

Success Aboard the David B in 2020

Small Ship Cruise in Glacier Bay
David B in Glacier Bay

This year has been quite the roller coaster ride for everyone and running a small business in the middle of a global pandemic hasn’t been especially easy either. To pull off this season we ducked and dodged, pivoted, changed, rescheduled, and repositioned. We stayed up late running scenarios and talking about “what-ifs.” We made plans, submitted documents, made decisions, and phoned, emailed and texted with guests. We rescheduled, pushed dates back, and did more rescheduling. At times it felt like a never-ending juggling act. It has been exhausting with all the concerns and the fears of the unknown. However, exhaustion and fear haven’t stopped us. With a lot of thought, planning, and care (especially from our guests) we were able to conduct an abbreviated season in Alaska. It felt like a HUGE win.

Here’s why our season worked:

  • Testing – Alaska’s Health Mandates required people traveling to Alaska to present a negative test result within 72 hours prior to arrival. While this is not required in the state of Washington, we are requiring this same testing for our San Juan Islands cruises.
  • Masks – Wearing masks during travel to the boat was key to us being able to run trips. This kept guests safe after their tests while they made their way to the boat.
  • Black bear in Alaska
    Black bear at Fords Terror

    Pre-trip preparations – Besides being tested and wearing masks during travel, all of our guests practiced pre-trip isolation and kept a log of their temperature for 14-days prior to travel.

Jeffrey and I also kept to ourselves and limited our contacts and stayed out of restaurants, bars. We also tested before each trip. We needed to make sure that we were also being conscientious and safe.

Glacier in Alaska Small ship cruise
Walking among icebergs at Lamplough Glacier

The reward for all the planning and preparations this year was having Alaska essentially to ourselves. There were few other boats and no cruise ships. This year gave our guests (and us) the chance to escape from the stress of a frightening global pandemic and some time to recharge. It was a truly amazing experience. I felt like we saw more of the wild part of the wilderness. It was more visible as a habitat and ecosystem and not just a playground for human beings. The solitude could be eerie, but then a sense of peace would overcome that eerie feeling with the notion that the silver lining of the pandemic is a chance to be still and reevaluate our priorities.

For me, I see travel as a priority that is essential to human hearts and souls. As curious animals, most of us desire to see new places and to meet new people. It’s because when we explore or take on an adventure that we learn and the world becomes more alive. During this time of restriction and isolation, I have realized just how much travel means to me, and not as a tour operator, but as someone who desires to grow and be shaped by the experiences gained from my travels. Maintaining travel as a priority has become even more important to me.

Each one of us has our own level of acceptable risk. And each one of us will return to travel when the time is right. As we celebrate that we safely conducted our Alaska season, we recognize that we can’t let up. We are committed to the same level of care and concern in 2021 and beyond. You can be assured that we will continue to offer the opportunity to reschedule trips due to issues related to coronavirus and we will continue our best practices to provide you with the safest possible way to visit Alaska, the Inside Passage, or the San Juan Islands.

Touching a glacier in Alaska
Captain Jeffrey touches a glacier

I also need to say, I am extremely grateful to all of our guests who came to Alaska with us this year. You helped us gain the experience to successfully operate in ways that other types of cruises cannot. Your willingness to undergo a stringent preparation to travel set a good example for our small niche market to succeed. You helped not just us and the David B, but our whole niche to recover through your careful actions. At this time, it looks like all of our owner/operator boat friends who went north this year were also successful with their abbreviated seasons. This reinforces my feelings that our style of small independent travel attracts the most conscientious and respectful people. For that, thank you!

We are also grateful to all of our guests who worked with us to reschedule for 2021 and 2022. While we missed you, we look forward to seeing you and we are deeply grateful for your flexibility in a difficult time.

We have one San Juan Islands trip and a couple of opportunities for whole boat charters in the San Juans before we exit the turbulent waters of 2020 and focus on 2021 and beyond. If you are interested in any of our remaining trips, this year, next year, or in 2022, please feel free to contact us.

Stay well, be safe,

Christine
PS – If you have any questions about testing or PPE in regards to travel to the David B, Sarah is more than happy to talk with you. She can be reached at her email or at 360-474-7218

Epic Glacier Day

I keep a little journal and I thought you might like to see what I wrote about. I titled it Epic Glacier Day

May 26 – 0544  Epic Glacier Day:

Journalwoke up in front of Reid Glacier.

Actually, Epic Glacier Day (EGD) really started the day before when we dropped anchor and spent several hours ashore at Reid glacier’s snout taking pictures as part of our photography workshop cruise. EGD started by waking up anchored face to face with a massive glacier. As I prepared coffee and breakfast, I occasionally walked outside to stare at the glacier and to listen to the sounds of the glacier’s rushing meltwater streams and waterfalls. The water sounds would occasionally be interrupted by the calls of some of my favorite birds – black oystercatchers. Although small bits of ice floated in the inlet, this glacier no longer calves big icebergs into the water. It has retreated to rest on a mudflat, and high tides now only kiss Reid’s wide icy snout.

 

went to Johns Hopkins then Margerie

Small Cruise Ship David B at Reid Glacier, Glacier Bay Alaska
David B at anchor in front of Reid Glacier.

We made a stop at Lamplough Glacier, which sits like a watchdog to the entrance of Johns Hopkins Inlet. The sky had cleared to a bright blue. We paid our respects to Lamplough and entered Johns Hopkins Inlet for a view of Johns Hopkins Glacier as it spilled into the inlet from the impossibly high and jagged Fairweather Mountains. After witnessing an enormous avalanche spill onto the glacier, we turned to continue EGD with our fourth and fifth glaciers – Margerie and the Grand Pacific.

spent a couple hours at Margerie in the skiff

Johns Hopkins Inlet and Glacier, Glacier Bay Alaska
Johns Hopkins Glacier and Mountains of the Fairweather Range

We anchored in Tarr Inlet about a mile away from Margerie. It had recently been active. Small bergs and brash ice floated past our anchorage. Hundreds of black-legged kittiwakes were nesting about a half-mile away. Margerie glacier is beautifully showy with the whitest ice and actively calving. The Grand Pacific seems shy and more sedentary. It’s covered in a blanket of dirt and rock, and seldom calves. It seems content to let Margerie have all the attention.

We lowered the skiff for the best part of EGD — a ride to the face of an active tidewater glacier.

 

a humpback surfaced next to the David B at anchor

Margerie Glacier in Glacier Bay Alaska
Margerie Glacier

Not long after we got the skiff in the water a humpback whale entered Tarr Inlet. I surfaced twice nearby the David B, and one of the surfacings was really close to the skiff.

-6-10 sea otters on icebergs

We kept our cameras and our focus on Margerie. We waited to capture the moment that a tower of ice would fall into the water. We made bets on where ice would fall from, and we held hopes that a big one would let loose.

While watching the glacier, a group of sea otters swam along the floating ice, and an eagle landed on the great face of the glacier. No visible part of Margerie was left unphotographed. Every peak, every icy spire, every kittiwake, and every iceberg was part of this magical landscape. I felt the need to absorb it all. To capture every sight, every sound, every emotion. To hold on to this moment for as long as possible. I wanted

Small cruise ship in Glacier Bay's Tarr Inlet
David B anchored in Tarr Inlet with Margerie Glacier and the Grand Pacific Glacier.

to wrap it all up, take it home, and share it with anyone who needed a good dose of Mother Nature.

 

 

I didn’t write anymore but we remained anchored in Tarr Inlet that night. I remember that from time-to-time we could hear the boom of ice calving off Margerie, the sounds of the kittiwake colony, and the silence of nature. Magnificent mountains surrounded us. The sun dipped behind the peaks, and again another boom and more ice would be spilled.

It was the perfect Epic Glacier Day.                                                                                      

-Christine

Skiffy-a-saurus Wins Again!

Skiffy-a-saurus Wins Again!

By Jeffrey Smith

We built a new skiff for this season and we’ve been really loving how much it’s changed things.

It was kind of a last minute decision, and the builders really rushed to get it done for us. We only loaded it on board the day before our season started, It’s huge by comparison to our old skiff (which by an interesting requirement at the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, had been known as Skiffy.)  The new one is so big (to us) that we named it Skiffy-a-saurus.

We use it for all the things we used to do. It’s really good and stable (people can stand up and move around while we’re moving) and it easy to climb in and out of at the beach. We’re using it for getting into kayaks too, but but now we’ve added a couple other activities to our skiff repertoire. The best one– skiff exploring.

We didn’t use Skiffy much for exploring, because it’s capacity was so limited, usually only half the group, but now, everyone can go at once. Now when we get to a new cove or harbor and drop the anchor, we all pile in Skiffy-a-saurus and head out to explore the shoreline. We putt along at 3 or 4 knots, sometimes shutting down the motor to drift and listen, and really get to see what’s there. On this last trip alone, we watched eagles and gulls, saw deer feeding at the water’s edge, spied on crab crawling across the bottom, even drifted while harbor porpoises and icebergs circled the boat. But the best one yet… We watched a brown bear right up close!

Barnacles for Breakfast – Paw licking good!

It was morning, just before breakfast. The sun was lighting up one side of the little fjord we were anchored in. The other side was still in the shade. A brown bear swam across from the sunny side into the shadows on the other side. It was probably a half a mile down the shore. We watched it for 15 or 20 minutes, then Christine suggested we go take a look with Skiffy-a-saurus. Everyone got their cameras, and we all quietly climbed in.
.
I headed us over to the shore, then hugged the shore as I idled us close to where he was. At about a hundred feet from the bear, I shut down and let the tide carry us along the shore. We were just feet from the rocky edge. Slowly we got closer and closer, The grizzly didn’t seem to notice (or care) that we were there. No one made a sound. When we were even with him on the beach we were probably only 30 feet away! About 15 of that was deep water, so we calmly took pictures and watched as he poked among the rocks, eating barnacles and mussels.  Then we followed him back down the beach for almost another 10 minutes. It was fantastic. Chalk another one up for Skiffy-a-saurus because this moment was only possible because of it.

Skiffy-a-saurus wins again.

“Say that’s a nice skiff you have there!” – Grizzy admiring our Skiffy-a-saurus

Trip #295 Recap – Glacier Bay Photography Class – May 22-29, 2017

Trip #295 Glacier Bay Photography Class – Trip Recap

Glacier Bay is really, really amazing.

When we left for “the Bay” a week ago, I had this feeling that I always have as we depart — what will we find on this adventure? It’s not about the things that we see on almost every trip, like the whales or the glaciers. It’s the new things: the places we haven’t seen before, the wildlife we find that isn’t on our other trips, and the guests, many of whom we’ve never met before.

The best part is, we found lots of new things. We got a great tip from the rangers at Bartlett Cove who suggested we anchor near the McBride Glacier and walk the beach at low tide amongst the grounded icebergs. It was beautiful. It was a sculpture garden of ice, pieces as small as a baseball to pieces as large as a truck. The photography possibilities were absolutely endless, and it was a photography trip, of course.

The McBride glacier calves bergs into a narrow river that flows out to Muir inlet, but just at the confluence, the river narrows and shallows and the bergs get stuck. More and more come down the river and crash into the already grounded ones. Then, as the tide goes out, you can walk around them on the beach as they lay at all sorts of crazy angles, waiting for the next tide to float them free again. One of the photography experts and trip leaders, John D’Onofrio, thought it was the most beautiful place he’d ever been.

Instructor, John D’Onofrio dwarfed by Reid Glacier
Along the way there were classes on photography and post-processing of images, light and color and lots more. Alan Sanders, our other trip leader, taught along with John, and no one lacked for good subject matter. It was everywhere. The evenings were full of photo critiques and wonderful meals.

A few days later, having spent the night in front of a receding glacier, we went to the entrance to Johns Hopkins Inlet and stepped up the amazement level again. The glacier is tucked back into the Fairweather range and has almost vertical snow covered sides extending 5 miles back to the glacier front, and the valley goes miles beyond, as the glacier swoops out of sight into the mountains. We even witnessed a thousand foot avalanche beside the glacier.

This was almost too much, and even John had to call for a mid-day break. Everyone need some time to absorb the amazement and the wonder of the place. It was indescribable. Of course, never wanting to back off the pace for a moment, when people awoke I loaded them in the skiff and we went for a 2 hour ride (in the sun) to watch another glacier, the Margerie glacier calve.

It was just amazing, And it really was “almost too much…”

Trip #293 Recap – April 27-30, 2017 – San Juan Islands

Trip #294 – San Juan Islands Trip Recap

Ever wonder what happens on one of our 4-day San Juan Islands escapes? Now you know what scenic anchorages we took, what amazing food Christine made and what incredible sights we saw along the way with a day-by-day breakdown.

Day 1) 26 April – Bellingham to Sucia Island – Echo Bay anchorage

  • Nature hike to Fossil Bay with Christine
  • Saw Bald Eagles, Camus in bloom, Banana Slugs, Pigeon Guillemots, Harlequin Ducks, Saskatoon Berries in Bloom
  • Baked Sockeye salmon with a honey balsamic finishing sauce for dinner with homemade ice cream for dessert
pigeon guillemots
Day 2) 27 April – Kayaking after a leisurely breakfast, then Echo Bay to Garrison Bay
  • Lots of Eagles, pigeon guillemots and geese
  • Creamy Scallop Risotto with Carnaroli Rice, over a bed of spinach, with oyster and shiitake mushrooms and brownies with ice cream for dessert
Day 3) 28 April – Left Garrison after lunch with anchorage in Blind Bay on Shaw Island.
  • A leisurely morning, spent reading and chatting on the boat and in the new Saloon
  • Then Hiking at Bell Point and English Camp
  • Pork tenderloin with black truffle and mushroom pan sauce.
 green point sea lions
Day 4) 29 April – Blind Bay to Rosario Resort, then a return to Bellingham
  • Christine’s amazing Croissants and Pain au Chocolat
  • Exploring Rosario Historical Museum in the main mansion.
  • Whisky crab soup for lunch
  • Disembarking and fond farewells

Experience the San Juan Islands in person! We still have plenty of spots available once the David B returns from Alaska in August. Just look at our Schedule and then email Sarah@northwestnavigation.com to reserve your spot today!

New Glacier Bay Photography Cruise

Small Cruise Ship in Glacier BayThis is really exciting! We are teaming up with AdventuresNW Magazine editor John D’Onofrio, and Quicksliver Photo Lab’s Digital Imaging Specialist and instructor, Alan Sanders for an 8-Day Photography Cruise in Glacier Bay.We’ve been working with John and Alan over the last several months to develop a special cruise for photographers that combines all the excitement of our Alaska trips with hands-on intensive instruction, new techniques for photography, and nightly constructive critique sessions.

If you’ve been on the David B before, you know I’m a complete and total Shutter Bug and having a chance to have two great instructors aboard the David B makes me absolutely giddy! I’m looking forward to this trip as a way to share the beauty and magnificence of Glacier Bay with you, as well as, having the opportunity to learn a whole lot more about how to take great photographs!

If you’d like to join us on this special cruise, visit our website for more information or give Sarah a call at 877-670-7863 or send her an email.

Glacier Bay Photography Cruise
Trip Number: 295
Dates: May 22-29, 2017
Boards/Returns: Auke Bay (Juneau)
Rates Per Person: $5600 (Special Introductory Pricing – $300 off 2017 rates!)

In the meantime, please enjoy the little video below I made from a trip we did last summer to Glacier Bay with Captain Jeffrey’s family and a couple of our good friends.

Fair Winds,
Christine