×
☰ MENU

Ice Spires of Lamplough Glacier

There’s a short walk next to Lamplough Glacier in Glacier Bay National Park where, if you take the time you’ll get to appreciate the slow march of glacial history written into the accumulated layers of ancient snowfalls.

This photo was from July 2019 on our Glacier Bay with AdventuresNW Magazine’s Photography Workshop. To learn more about this cruise in 2020, click here…

Sundew, the midge eating plant

Insect eating Sundew in an Alaskan MuskegSundew are some of the coolest plants we get to show our guests. They catch insects in their sticky dew-like secretions as a way to get nutrients that are not available in the nutrition poor muskeg. They’re also small and easily missed.

This photo was taken on one of our Petersburg to Juneau Alaska Inside Passage cruises in June of 2019.

Hidden Glacier

Hidden glacier in endicott arm on a small ship cruise in AlaskaOnce upon a time, this Glacier was a tributary to Dawes Glacier in Endicott Arm. Now it’s a peek-a-boo reminder of a cooler time when glaciers filled Endicott Arm. One thing I like to think about as we pass this particular glacier is how you can see in the vegetation that the glacier had been in its valley as recently as 50 years ago. That’s because the low shrubby willow and alder are considered pioneer plants that are slowly helping to make soils. As time passes trees like cottonwood will begin to grow and eventually those trees will be replaced with a spruce and hemlock forest.

This photo was taken our Southeast Alaska Fjords Photography Workshop. To learn more about this trip click here.

 

Blue Ice on a Rainy Day

Iceberg in AlaskaRainy days are one of my guilty pleasures. Partly because the David B is always so warm and cozy on the inside, but also because rainy days accentuates the blueness of icebergs. This was my favorite iceberg from last year. I was really impressed with the way the two towers stayed propped up against each other as they floated around in Endicott Arm. To learn more about our Alaska cruises.

Killer Whales in Endicott Arm

Two killer whales in Alaska's Endicott ArmWe had an amazing encounter with these mammal-eating killer whales this past summer. While we were leaving our anchorage they were coming towards us in pursuit of some sort of prey, maybe harbor seals or maybe Harbor porpoises, we could see. But watching them hunt with wolf-like coordination was breathtaking.

For more information https://northwestnavigation.com/alaska_inside_passage/ on our Alaska trips…

Time-Lapse into the Back of Fords Terror

Fords Terror is, hands-down, one of our favorite locations. We often anchor there in a bowl that is surrounded by 2000-3000 foot high sheer cliff walls with mature spruce and hemlock trees clinging to the seemingly soilless rock. It’s a place where the rain and waterfalls and icebergs create mystical scenes as ravens and eagles fly overhead. Our usual anchorage is amazing, but as always for us, there might be something more just around the corner. At Fords Terror that something more is just on the other side of a narrow constriction and some reversing tidal rapids.

On most trips, we take our guests through the narrows in the skiff. We plan to ride the current in before the tidal floodwater reaches it’s highest high for the day and becomes still before the current changes to an outgoing ebb. We typically spend a couple of hours skiffing around, looking at waterfalls, amazing geology, and sometimes even bears. Then, we’ve always come out on the ebbing current. Jeffrey had always wanted to take the David B into the back, and spend the night. He was curious to see and experience Fords Terror at both high tide and low tide and to see how the back of Fords Terror’s beauty changed over the course of a day. It was so magical that we did something we don’t often do, we decided to spend, not one night but two nights at anchor there. Below is a short time-lapse video of us going into Fords Terror. We hope you enjoy it.

Winter Project – The Tin Top

We have an exciting winter project this year. We’re replacing the roof over the galley and at the same time extending the roof over the back of the boat to give us and our guests a nice new covered fantail where we can enjoy being outside on hot sunny days as well as rainy cool days. The video below is a timelapse of Jeffrey and our winter employee, Tim removing the galley roof.

Conversation Stopper

John D’onofrio and Al Sanders are two northwest photographers with a long history and friendship. They also conduct photography workshops aboard the David B. This week on our Northwest Navigation podcast we talk to John and Al about their philosophies in photography, wilderness, and being in the moment. For more information on our workshops with John and Al visit our Glacier Bay Photography Workshop and Fjords and Bears Photography Workshop pages.

 

 

Listen: Conversation Stopper on iTunes
Listen: Conversation Stopper on Spotify
Listen: Conversation Stopper on Google

Marie Duckworth came on our Bears and Glaciers photography workshop in 2018. Here’s the photo that they described in their conversation.

 

Marie Duckworth’s brown bear picture from our 2018 Bears and Glaciers photography workshop – Used with permission

 

Everyone Needs a Sarah

Reservations specialist - sarah kirkish - small cruise ship alaska - David BSarah Kirkish is a vital part of Northwest Navigation. She’s the one who answers your emails, phone calls, and general questions about the David B and our cruises. Before she started working with us she came on the David B as a passenger for a San Juan Islands Cruise. Several years later she started house-sitting for us in the summer and taking care of our two cats, Harriet and Oswald. Soon she started helping with shore-side support which includes getting our mail to Alaska. Now she’s our reservations specialist and Office Manager. Sarah has a fascinating background as an automotive safety engineer and an urban nomad. We hope you enjoy getting to know Sarah and this week’s podcast where you’ll see why we always say, “everyone needs a Sarah.”

Northwest Navigation Podcast - Pack Creek Bears

Listen: Everyone needs a Sarah on iTunes
Listen: Everyone needs a Sarah on Spotify
Listen: Everyone needs a Sarah on Google

 

Click below to listen now:

Getting out with your images – Podcast with Photographer Matt Meisenheimer

Matt Meisenheimer photography workshop cruise and toursThe David B is a fantastic platform for photography, and some of our favorite cruises are our Photography Workshops in both Alaska and the San Juan Islands. As part of our Northwest Navigation Podcast, we interviewed photography instructor and nature photographer Matt Meisenheimer about what has shaped him as a photographer and some of his favorite photo adventures.

Matt will be leading our Alaska Fjords Photography Workshop this July – Trip #340. Be sure to check out our Schedule Page for dates, rates, availability, and discounts for this cruise and workshop.

 

Northwest Navigation Podcast - Pack Creek Bears Listen: Getting out with your images – Northwest Navigation Website

Listen: Getting our with your images – iTunes

Listen: Getting out with your images – Spotify

Listen: Getting out with your images – Google

About Matt: Matt is a Wisconsin based photographer. His artistry revolves around exploring the wilderness and constantly seeking new adventures. He strives to capture brief moments of dramatic light and weather. Matt loves the process of photography — from planning trips and scouting locations to taking the shots in-field, and post-processing the final image.

Scroll down to view some of Matt’s images:

 

Ice Cave - Matt Meisenheimer Photography

Two Bears Play Fighting - Matt Meisenheimer Photography

Matt Meisenheimer Photography - Alaska landdscape