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Jeffrey’s Got Us Organized

Winter Projects on the Chart Boat David BHaving an eighty-plus year-old wooden boat is a lot of work, and it is sometimes hard to decide which projects are the most important to tackle. For instance,  do we re-do the pilothouse, or install a new heating system? When should we start work on the engine? Do we buy a new keel cooler or grind the valves on the engine and generator?  These are all on the To-do list and not long ago, as we wrestled with these questions, Jeffrey came up with an idea for how to best organize our list and make our decisions for how to tackle our project list.

To read how Jeffrey got us organized, hop on over to the David B’s blog on Yachting Magazine for the answer.

As we work on making the David B beautiful during the winter months, we look forward to having a great summer of cruising in the San Juan Islands and Inside Passage.

Great Boater Education Organizations

Center for Wooden Boats
Center for Wooden Boats

Since the release of More Faster Backwards, Jeffrey and I have been invited to give talks about how we restored the M/V David B. What has impressed me about the places that we talk, is how much enthusiasm surrounds these groups for educating boaters of all kinds. Some of the groups we’ve talked to empathize seamanship skills, while others are more focused on boat building. I recently wrote a post for Yachting Magazine about our experiences giving talks to United States Power Squadrons, the Center for Wooden Boats and Northwest Maritime Center.

 

http://www.yachtingmagazine.com/blog-post/how-to/seamanship/opportunities-for-boating-education

 

 

 

Opening Up the Pilothouse

The biggest project we’ll be working on this winter is building a new fridge and freezer for the boat. After thinking about this project for several years, we decided that the space between trunk cabin and the front of the pilothouse is the perfect spot since it’s a space that doesn’t get much use. We also need to remove some of the original wood from the front of the pilothouse that has started rotting. Most of the rot has come from rainwater that settles in under the pockets where the windows drop down.

This week was devoted to removing the old wood and assessing what needs to be replaced. Click on the pictures to see them as larger images.

David B | Winter Outfitting 2012 | Pilothouse Before Work Begins
Jeffrey stands by the pilothouse of the David B before starting to remove the wood below the windows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | 2012 Winter Outfitting | Removing Wood
After cutting a guide line, Jeffrey starts demolition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting | Inside of Window Pockets
After opening up the front of the pilothouse, we exposed the inside of the window pockets. The small knee-like object is the stop for the window when it’s lowered.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting 2012 | Jeffrey Working on the Pilothouse
Jeffrey removing parts of the sill that the pilothouse sits on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting | Removing the front of the pilothouse
The end of the first day of demolition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting | Found Items
We found some interesting objects in the window pockets. Here are two wedges that are used to slid in between a window and the window pocket frame. Jeffrey made a set of these in our second year of operation. We used them to lower the windows a little way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting 2012 | Window Pockets
Inside of the window pockets. To keep the rain out and prevent rot, the original shipwrights put painted canvas against the back of the inside tongue and groove. The wood was painted with white lead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting | Found Items | Tool
We found this tool in one of the window pockets. Neither one of us know what it was used for, but someone was probably bummed when they lost it.