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Baird Glacier Landscape

Rocks on the outwash plain at Baird Glacier. In 2015 a glacial outburst flood called a jokulhlaup broke the glacier away from its terminal moraine. The landscape was completely changed. A friend said another outburst flood happened in September. We’re looking forward to seeing what changes the glacier made to its landscape. It’s what we love about spending time around glaciers. They always are up to something.

Join us in Alaska for a chance to see and learn more about this incredible and dynamic landscape. For our most in-depth trips, we suggest either Trip #336, AdventuresNW Magazine’s Photography Workshop or Trip #339, Ecology of Southeast Alaska with naturalist and killer whale researcher John McInnes.

Photography workshop in Alaska aboard a small cruise ship
Rocks and sand at Baird Glacier

Don’t forget to do your plank today

The good bears at Pack Creek would like to remind you that a couple minutes of plank every day will help build good strong core muscles.

If you love bears, come on one of our Alaska cruises. In 2019 we are teaming back up with Pack Creek Bear Tours to visit the Pack Creek Bear Viewing Area. This is a special experience where you get to closely observe coastal brown bears. We have two trips that include Pack Creek in our 2019 schedule:

Bear watching at Pack Creek in Alaska
Brown bear at Pack Creek in Alaska.

 

Trip #334: Glaciers, Fjords, and Bears 
Dates: May 11-18, 2019
Departs: Petersburg
Disembarks: Auke Bay, Juneau

For More information:  https://northwestnavigation.com/petersburg-to-juneau-with-pack-creek-bear-viewing/

Trip #336: AdventuresNW Magazine Photo Workshop – Tracy Arm/Fords Terror Wilderness & Pack Creek Bear Viewing
Dates: May 31 – June 9, 2019
Departs: Auke Bay, Juneau
Disembarks: Petersburg

For more information: https://northwestnavigation.com/alaska-adventure-photography-cruise/

 

Glacier Bay Permits — We Got Um!

Glacier Bay concessionaire contract awarded to the David B

Photography Workshop tour in Glacier Bay Alaska at McBride Glacier
McBride Glacier in Glacier Bay, Alaska

by Jeffrey Smith

If you were on the boat, or even within earshot of us this summer, you probably heard us talking about trying to get a permit to operate in Glacier Bay National Park. It was a difficult thing for us, mostly because of the timing. The Park released the prospectus in the middle of our spring outfitting season, and we scrambled to have our proposal complete. Luckily we have Sarah, who did a lot of the writing, editing, checking and re-checking to make sure we had it all in perfect shape to submit.

Then we waited – for 5 months.

We weren’t sure if we could even schedule any trips in Glacier Bay because we didn’t know what the status of the permit was. Then earlier this month, we found out. We got it. So we’re going, and you should come with us.

Glacier Bay is amazing. The wildlife is everywhere, there are species that you’d have a hard time seeing in other Alaska spots. Things like puffins and mountain goats. On our past trips there, we’ve also seen loads of humpback whales, orca whales, brown bears, black bears, and moose.

Then there’s the ice. We anchor in front of glaciers and walk up to their faces. We slowly skiff through fjords choked with floating ice and sneak up to glaciers that are calving. The photography experience is phenomenal. You won’t find this anywhere else.

Come join us. (We’ve got the permits) **

Glacier Bay Trips: Adventures NW Glacier Bay Photography Workshops

Trip #335 May 21-28, 2019

Trip #341 July 20-27, 2019

https://northwestnavigation.com/glacier-bay-photography-cruise/

** Fine Print: Technically in National Park Language, we have been awarded a concession contract to provide charter boat services in Glacier Bay National Park from 2019 to 2029. People might not understand that, so to simplify it we refer to it as a permit.

Dreaming In Glacier Bay – Adventures NW Magazine

Article in Adventreus NW Magazine about our Glacier Bay Photography WorkshopLast year we did our first Photography Workshop in conjunction with Adventures NW Magazine. Here’s a link to their website with an article describing what it was like to spend 8-days learning about photography and post-processing photographs in Glacier Bay on the David B.

http://www.adventuresnw.com/dreaming-in-glacier-bay/

After reading this article, we know you’ll want to go on one of our Photo Workshop cruises, so be sure to check out our 2018 schedule and itineraries for photography workshops.

Alaska’s Fjords and Pack Creek Bear Viewing Photography Workshop

https://northwestnavigation.com/alaska-adventure-photography-cruise/

Glacier Bay Photography Workshop

https://northwestnavigation.com/glacier-bay-photography-cruise/

 

 

Epic Glacier Day

I keep a little journal and I thought you might like to see what I wrote about. I titled it Epic Glacier Day

May 26 – 0544  Epic Glacier Day:

Journalwoke up in front of Reid Glacier.

Actually, Epic Glacier Day (EGD) really started the day before when we dropped anchor and spent several hours ashore at Reid glacier’s snout taking pictures as part of our photography workshop cruise. EGD started by waking up anchored face to face with a massive glacier. As I prepared coffee and breakfast, I occasionally walked outside to stare at the glacier and to listen to the sounds of the glacier’s rushing meltwater streams and waterfalls. The water sounds would occasionally be interrupted by the calls of some of my favorite birds – black oystercatchers. Although small bits of ice floated in the inlet, this glacier no longer calves big icebergs into the water. It has retreated to rest on a mudflat, and high tides now only kiss Reid’s wide icy snout.

 

went to Johns Hopkins then Margerie

Small Cruise Ship David B at Reid Glacier, Glacier Bay Alaska
David B at anchor in front of Reid Glacier.

We made a stop at Lamplough Glacier, which sits like a watchdog to the entrance of Johns Hopkins Inlet. The sky had cleared to a bright blue. We paid our respects to Lamplough and entered Johns Hopkins Inlet for a view of Johns Hopkins Glacier as it spilled into the inlet from the impossibly high and jagged Fairweather Mountains. After witnessing an enormous avalanche spill onto the glacier, we turned to continue EGD with our fourth and fifth glaciers – Margerie and the Grand Pacific.

spent a couple hours at Margerie in the skiff

Johns Hopkins Inlet and Glacier, Glacier Bay Alaska
Johns Hopkins Glacier and Mountains of the Fairweather Range

We anchored in Tarr Inlet about a mile away from Margerie. It had recently been active. Small bergs and brash ice floated past our anchorage. Hundreds of black-legged kittiwakes were nesting about a half-mile away. Margerie glacier is beautifully showy with the whitest ice and actively calving. The Grand Pacific seems shy and more sedentary. It’s covered in a blanket of dirt and rock, and seldom calves. It seems content to let Margerie have all the attention.

We lowered the skiff for the best part of EGD — a ride to the face of an active tidewater glacier.

 

a humpback surfaced next to the David B at anchor

Margerie Glacier in Glacier Bay Alaska
Margerie Glacier

Not long after we got the skiff in the water a humpback whale entered Tarr Inlet. I surfaced twice nearby the David B, and one of the surfacings was really close to the skiff.

-6-10 sea otters on icebergs

We kept our cameras and our focus on Margerie. We waited to capture the moment that a tower of ice would fall into the water. We made bets on where ice would fall from, and we held hopes that a big one would let loose.

While watching the glacier, a group of sea otters swam along the floating ice, and an eagle landed on the great face of the glacier. No visible part of Margerie was left unphotographed. Every peak, every icy spire, every kittiwake, and every iceberg was part of this magical landscape. I felt the need to absorb it all. To capture every sight, every sound, every emotion. To hold on to this moment for as long as possible. I wanted

Small cruise ship in Glacier Bay's Tarr Inlet
David B anchored in Tarr Inlet with Margerie Glacier and the Grand Pacific Glacier.

to wrap it all up, take it home, and share it with anyone who needed a good dose of Mother Nature.

 

 

I didn’t write anymore but we remained anchored in Tarr Inlet that night. I remember that from time-to-time we could hear the boom of ice calving off Margerie, the sounds of the kittiwake colony, and the silence of nature. Magnificent mountains surrounded us. The sun dipped behind the peaks, and again another boom and more ice would be spilled.

It was the perfect Epic Glacier Day.                                                                                      

-Christine