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Dreaming in Glacier Bay

A Visual Meditation

Take a few minutes to escape into John D’onofrio’s beautiful photography set to haunting flute music. He put together this short meditation to inspire those of us who dream of great landscapes in distant lands. John is one of our photography instructors and this slideshow video is from several years of trips with us in Glacier Bay National Park.

Humpback Whale Diving

Humpback whale diving in Alaska

Sometimes we will be sitting in an open area watching whales when one will surface and swim towards us. There are so many beautiful sounds: the whales’s breath, the sound of water cascading off its body, and the laughter and joy from our passengers.

Taken on one of Marine Ecology of Southeast Alaska trips.

The Blues of Reid Glacier

Glacier Blues in Glacier Bay Alaska

Growing up, my favorite color was always blue. Maybe that’s why I enjoy bringing people to glaciers so much.

This is from Glacier Bay Nationa Park’s Reid Glacier. There was just a little space at the edge of the Glacier where if you looked just right you could see under the glacier. It wasn’t big enough to be a cave, but its icy blues were tantalizing. To learn more about our photography workshops in Glacier National Park…

Sundew, the midge eating plant

Insect eating Sundew in an Alaskan MuskegSundew are some of the coolest plants we get to show our guests. They catch insects in their sticky dew-like secretions as a way to get nutrients that are not available in the nutrition poor muskeg. They’re also small and easily missed.

This photo was taken on one of our Petersburg to Juneau Alaska Inside Passage cruises in June of 2019.

Hidden Glacier

Hidden glacier in endicott arm on a small ship cruise in AlaskaOnce upon a time, this Glacier was a tributary to Dawes Glacier in Endicott Arm. Now it’s a peek-a-boo reminder of a cooler time when glaciers filled Endicott Arm. One thing I like to think about as we pass this particular glacier is how you can see in the vegetation that the glacier had been in its valley as recently as 50 years ago. That’s because the low shrubby willow and alder are considered pioneer plants that are slowly helping to make soils. As time passes trees like cottonwood will begin to grow and eventually those trees will be replaced with a spruce and hemlock forest.

This photo was taken our Southeast Alaska Fjords Photography Workshop. To learn more about this trip click here.

 

Blue Ice on a Rainy Day

Iceberg in AlaskaRainy days are one of my guilty pleasures. Partly because the David B is always so warm and cozy on the inside, but also because rainy days accentuates the blueness of icebergs. This was my favorite iceberg from last year. I was really impressed with the way the two towers stayed propped up against each other as they floated around in Endicott Arm. To learn more about our Alaska cruises.

Killer Whales in Endicott Arm

Two killer whales in Alaska's Endicott ArmWe had an amazing encounter with these mammal-eating killer whales this past summer. While we were leaving our anchorage they were coming towards us in pursuit of some sort of prey, maybe harbor seals or maybe Harbor porpoises, we could see. But watching them hunt with wolf-like coordination was breathtaking.

For more information https://northwestnavigation.com/alaska_inside_passage/ on our Alaska trips…

Time-Lapse into the Back of Fords Terror

Fords Terror is, hands-down, one of our favorite locations. We often anchor there in a bowl that is surrounded by 2000-3000 foot high sheer cliff walls with mature spruce and hemlock trees clinging to the seemingly soilless rock. It’s a place where the rain and waterfalls and icebergs create mystical scenes as ravens and eagles fly overhead. Our usual anchorage is amazing, but as always for us, there might be something more just around the corner. At Fords Terror that something more is just on the other side of a narrow constriction and some reversing tidal rapids.

On most trips, we take our guests through the narrows in the skiff. We plan to ride the current in before the tidal floodwater reaches it’s highest high for the day and becomes still before the current changes to an outgoing ebb. We typically spend a couple of hours skiffing around, looking at waterfalls, amazing geology, and sometimes even bears. Then, we’ve always come out on the ebbing current. Jeffrey had always wanted to take the David B into the back, and spend the night. He was curious to see and experience Fords Terror at both high tide and low tide and to see how the back of Fords Terror’s beauty changed over the course of a day. It was so magical that we did something we don’t often do, we decided to spend, not one night but two nights at anchor there. Below is a short time-lapse video of us going into Fords Terror. We hope you enjoy it.

Conversation Stopper

John D’onofrio and Al Sanders are two northwest photographers with a long history and friendship. They also conduct photography workshops aboard the David B. This week on our Northwest Navigation podcast we talk to John and Al about their philosophies in photography, wilderness, and being in the moment. For more information on our workshops with John and Al visit our Glacier Bay Photography Workshop and Fjords and Bears Photography Workshop pages.

 

 

Listen: Conversation Stopper on iTunes
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Marie Duckworth came on our Bears and Glaciers photography workshop in 2018. Here’s the photo that they described in their conversation.

 

Marie Duckworth’s brown bear picture from our 2018 Bears and Glaciers photography workshop – Used with permission