Tin Hat Update – Welding, Windows and More

Small cruise ship constructionThis week saw lots of progress on the Tin Hat Project. We stopped in at Fluid Fabrication to see how things were taking shape. They’d begun assembling the framework for the front of the pilothouse. It was the first time we got to see the curving lines of the new house for real. We’re not sure exactly how long it will take them to finish welding, but my feeling is soon. Maybe just a couple more weeks until we can bring the boat over and have the house put on.

While the welders have been busy, Jeffrey, Tim, and Greg have continued on all of their jeffrey-greg-doorprojects. Jeffrey’s work on the refrigeration system is shaping up nicely, and Tim’s been steadily preparing the boat so we can quickly and efficiently install all the systems in the new pilothouse. Greg’s been turning out windows and doors all week. Our good friends Pete and Jackie graciously loaned us the use of their garage to set up a varnish shop, and with the help of their daughter Naomi, I got started on the bright work. I also put together a little video for you to enjoy…

-Christine

Tin Hat Update – Mast, Stairs, and Coolers

TMotor Vessel David B Tin Hat Pilothouse Rebuildhere’s been a lot of progress on the Tin Hat Project in the last couple of weeks. We ended our 2016 cruising season on October 9th, and starting on October 10th with the help of some friends and family, we began removing everything from the David B to prepare for the new pilothouse.

We also welcomed back employees Greg K. who worked for us on the original rebuild project 12-years ago, and Tim A. who’s worked with us off and on for ten years as both a kayak guide and a jack-of-all-trades.

One of our first big projects was to remove the mast. It took a day or so of preparation before we
took the boat to Seaview North Boatyard. The weather was perfect. We pulled into the bay where we are usually hauled out of the water, but instead of having the TraveLift pick us up, they brought out a large crane came. The crew then set up some rigging and in less than half an hour, the masTin Hat Project David B Pilothouse Rebuildt was lifted out of the boat and onto ground. Later we removed all the hardware and bucked up the mast. Back in 2006 when we placed on the boat we followed an ancient tradition of placing coins under a new mast. The lore is that if the boat ever goes under and the crew lost, the crew will have money to pay the ferryman to cross the River Styx. After the mast was removed, Jeffrey carefully picked up the coins and stowed them away until the new mast is installed. We’ll be sure to add a 2017 coin to commemorate the year of the new mast.

Back the boat, Greg has been making the new Grand Staircase that leads to the cabins, and Tim’s been removing structures from the boat, like thTin Hat Project MV David B Pilothouse Rebuilde skylight, navigation station, and pilothouse trim. He’s also been helping Jeffrey lay the ground work for the new systems.

The new custom fridge and freezer, which Eli S. began work on in the spring, moved out of the shop and onto the boat.

While we’ve been busy on the boat and in the shop, the actual Tin Hat has been in construction. Sean and Nigel from Fluid Fabrication, in Bellingham have been working hard welding the structure.

There’s been a lot going and we’ve been thankful for all the help we’ve had so far. The first few days were filled with lots of mundane things, like carting load after load of David B stuff up the dock and into the storage locker. Thank you to Carol and Steve W., Dan K., Craig T. Jack M. and Eli S. for helping to make that workload much lighter!

-Christine

PS-  Here’s a video of removing the David B’s mast:

Traveling When You Were Young

 



Traveling When You Were Young

Traveling as a kid was so much fun. You didn’t have to worry about anything and you still got to enjoy all the same sights.  You could watch the world go by, albeit from the backseat window, but you still could see it all. Someone else took care of making sure you got there and making reservations and all that. All you had to do was look out the window and enjoy the ride.

When you finally arrived, you got to explore and find things: the ice machine at the hotel, or the trail to the beach from the campground. It was un-scripted. You could run off and play and “discover” stuff. I even had my own little Instamatic camera that I could use to take photos of the cool stuff I found.

Traveling Aboard the David B.

Cruising aboard the David B is a lot like traveling when you were young. Yeah, you do have to make your own reservations and get yourself to the boat, but once you’re aboard, you really can just look out the window and enjoy the ride. You can go for a hike and “discover” a few new things (and they’re going to be way more exciting than an ice machine.) You can paddle into a cove you’ve never seen before. You can watch the world go by out the galley windows, or you could also watch it from the Bridge, and capture it with a camera that’s a whole lot better than that one from 1965. And you still won’t have any of the responsibilities.

Someone else will make sure you get there.

inside passage cruises aboard the david b bellingham wa

Our new 2015 Sailing Schedule is now available!

Our Schedule for 2014 is Filling Fast

Be sure to stop by our website and have a look at our 2014 schedule. We have lots of great cruises in the San Juan Islands, Desolation Sound, and Alaska.

Don’t miss the boat! Call 360-201-8184 or email us to book your space.
Read the award winning story about how Captain Jeffrey and Christine rebuilt the M/V David B

Cruising on theDavid B

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Jeffrey’s Got Us Organized

Winter Projects on the Chart Boat David BHaving an eighty-plus year-old wooden boat is a lot of work, and it is sometimes hard to decide which projects are the most important to tackle. For instance,  do we re-do the pilothouse, or install a new heating system? When should we start work on the engine? Do we buy a new keel cooler or grind the valves on the engine and generator?  These are all on the To-do list and not long ago, as we wrestled with these questions, Jeffrey came up with an idea for how to best organize our list and make our decisions for how to tackle our project list.

To read how Jeffrey got us organized, hop on over to the David B’s blog on Yachting Magazine for the answer.

As we work on making the David B beautiful during the winter months, we look forward to having a great summer of cruising in the San Juan Islands and Inside Passage.

Great Boater Education Organizations

Center for Wooden Boats
Center for Wooden Boats

Since the release of More Faster Backwards, Jeffrey and I have been invited to give talks about how we restored the M/V David B. What has impressed me about the places that we talk, is how much enthusiasm surrounds these groups for educating boaters of all kinds. Some of the groups we’ve talked to empathize seamanship skills, while others are more focused on boat building. I recently wrote a post for Yachting Magazine about our experiences giving talks to United States Power Squadrons, the Center for Wooden Boats and Northwest Maritime Center.

 

http://www.yachtingmagazine.com/blog-post/how-to/seamanship/opportunities-for-boating-education

 

 

 

Opening Up the Pilothouse

The biggest project we’ll be working on this winter is building a new fridge and freezer for the boat. After thinking about this project for several years, we decided that the space between trunk cabin and the front of the pilothouse is the perfect spot since it’s a space that doesn’t get much use. We also need to remove some of the original wood from the front of the pilothouse that has started rotting. Most of the rot has come from rainwater that settles in under the pockets where the windows drop down.

This week was devoted to removing the old wood and assessing what needs to be replaced. Click on the pictures to see them as larger images.

David B | Winter Outfitting 2012 | Pilothouse Before Work Begins
Jeffrey stands by the pilothouse of the David B before starting to remove the wood below the windows.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | 2012 Winter Outfitting | Removing Wood
After cutting a guide line, Jeffrey starts demolition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting | Inside of Window Pockets
After opening up the front of the pilothouse, we exposed the inside of the window pockets. The small knee-like object is the stop for the window when it’s lowered.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting 2012 | Jeffrey Working on the Pilothouse
Jeffrey removing parts of the sill that the pilothouse sits on.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting | Removing the front of the pilothouse
The end of the first day of demolition.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting | Found Items
We found some interesting objects in the window pockets. Here are two wedges that are used to slid in between a window and the window pocket frame. Jeffrey made a set of these in our second year of operation. We used them to lower the windows a little way.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B | Winter Outfitting 2012 | Window Pockets
Inside of the window pockets. To keep the rain out and prevent rot, the original shipwrights put painted canvas against the back of the inside tongue and groove. The wood was painted with white lead.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

David B |  Winter Outfitting |  Found Items | Tool
We found this tool in one of the window pockets. Neither one of us know what it was used for, but someone was probably bummed when they lost it.